A Victim of Higher Space

Algernon Blackwood | published 1917

added May 31, 2024
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First Date of Publication
1917
Original Source
Day and Night Stories
Original Source Type
Anthology
Medium
Short Story
Original Language
English
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Summary: A man who seems to slip into and out of the fourth dimension in response to certain stimuli…

Story Tag Line: “This room we now sit in, Dr. Silence, has one side open to space—to higher space. A closed box only seems closed. There is a way in and out of a soap bubble without breaking the skin.”


Reviews

  • Vijay Fafat
    Published on

    This is another of the John Silence tall-tales, this time involving a man who learns to visualize 4-dimensional space and then starts slipping in and out of the hyperspace. As he describes it,

    “This room we now sit in, Dr. Silence, has one side open to space—to higher space. A closed box only seems closed. There is a way in and out of a soap bubble without breaking the skin.”

    And:

    “Certain people, certain human atmospheres, certain wandering forces, thoughts, desires even—the radiations of certain combinations of colour, and above all, the vibrations of certain kinds of music, will suddenly throw me into a state of what I can only describe as an intense and terrific inner vibration—and behold I am off! Off in the direction at right angles to all our known directions! Off in the direction the cube takes when it begins to trace the outlines of the new figure, the tessaract! Off into my breathless and semi-divine higher space! Off, inside myself, into the world of four dimensions!”

    And:

    “The audacious speculations of Bolyai, the amazing theories of Gauss—that through a point more than one line could be drawn parallel to a given line; the possibility that the angles of a triangle are together greater than two right angles, if drawn upon immense curvatures—the breathless intuitions of Beltrami and Lobatchewsky—all these I hurried through, and emerged, panting but unsatisfied, upon the verge of my—my world, my higher space possibilities—in a word, my disease!”